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Sept. 12, 2022

Jack's Justice - Part 1 - The First Round of Arrests


Welcome back to the first episode of Season Two. Pro Lerner, Bobby Fairbrothers, John E Rossi and Rudy Sciarra are all arrested on charges stemming from the 1968 double homicide of Rudy Marfeo and Anthony Melei. Richie and SA Rico implement their plan to get Rico transferred to the sunny beaches of Florida.

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Lara & Nina

Transcript

Lara:

 

Hi everyone! Nina and I are excited to be starting season two after a much needed rest. Welcome back to our regular listeners and welcome aboard to any new listeners who might be joining us for the first time.



Nina:

 

Season two is going to go by just as quickly as season one! Currently we have 44 episodes planned with a possible bonus episode here and there. 



Lara:

 

So many episodes to write and so little time.



Nina:

 

I think that “so many, so little time” line would’ve been something you said in your younger days referring to men.



Lara:

 

Nah, not me! 

 

Anyhow, today, we’re starting off in August of 1969. And yes, I know some of our listeners are chomping at the bit to move onto the ‘70s and beyond, but I promise we're almost done with the ‘60s. 



Nina:

 

And we’ve had plenty of requests for episodes and lots of interest in Sonny Shields.



Lara:

 

Who knew Sonny Shields was so popular?




Nina:

 

Well, we definitely have to honor those requests. 

 

This season will end in 1989, and hopefully enough of our listeners stick around, so we can cover the ‘90s and early 2000s in season three. You’ll all have to wait another year until we get to Lara’s 21st birthday and the Gardner Museum Heist.



Lara:

 

And NO, the paintings were NOT my birthday gift!

 

Enough of the chit chat, we have 20 years to get through, so we better get started.



Nina:

 

I think we should briefly go back to 1968 to touch on two things that pertain to today’s topic.



Lara:

 

Go for it!



Nina:

 

Some of our listeners might recall that in early 1968 Joseph Barboza’s attorney John Fitzgerald lost his leg while starting up Barboza’s James Bond car. Supposedly, the bomb was planted to scare Barboza into not testifying against Raymond Patriarca and other members of the New England Mafia and their associates. At the time Patriarca, Henry Tameleo and Ronnie Cassesso were on trial for the murder of Willie Marfeo, and the main prosecution witness, just like in the Teddy Deegan Murder Trial, was Barboza. Tameleo and Cassesso had already been convicted of the Deegan slaying, and sentenced to death row. After the bombing, the Willie Marfeo murder trial was briefly postponed. The following month on March 7th the case went to the jury when the defense rested after not calling a single witness. After 4 hours of deliberations, the jury returned guilty verdicts against the three men charged with conspiracy to commit murder. Raymond had been free on a $50,000 bond during the trial, and the judge allowed him to remain so until sentencing. Raymond’s attorney, Joe Balliro, blamed the verdict on his client’s notoriety.





Lara:

 

On March 25th Raymond was sentenced to five years in the Federal Pen in Atlanta and fined $10,000. His two co-defendants received the same sentence, but considering they were doing life already, it didn’t matter. Raymond was allowed to remain free pending appeal.



Nina:

 

Willie’s brother, Rudy Marfeo and Rudy’s driver, Anthony Melei were gunned down in Pannone’s market just a little less than a month later, on Saturday, April 20th. 

 

The first person to be picked up was Robert Almonte. On Monday, May 28th, Almonte was arrested at his social club on Atwells Ave in Providence, RI. The same club where back in early April the Providence PD arrested Louis Manocchio, Rudy Sciarra, John E. Rossi and Dickie Callei after they received a phone call that the boys were lying in wait for Joe Schiavone. Louis and the others were charged with illegal possession of firearms. Almonte was charged with possessing gambling paraphernalia, but all the charges were dropped soon after.  



Lara:

 

Well this time Almonte wasn’t so lucky. The following day on May 28, Almonte was arraigned for the murders of Rudy Marfeo and Anthony Melei. He pleaded not guilty, and was held without bail. 

 

I have to interrupt myself for a moment to say that one of our listeners told us the proper way to pronounce Marfeo “Mafio” I believe, but Nina and I are so used to pronouncing it the “wrong” way that I’m not sure we can correct that. Don’t be angry at us! 

 

Back to ‘68. While Almonte was being charged Rudy Sciarra, Pro Lerner and Jack Kelley were in Methuen riding in Pro’s car when they heard the news on the radio. Since they were chatting away during the announcement, all they caught was that someone had been pinched, but not who. Jack would later tell the Feds they were all concerned that Bobby Fairbrothers was the one who had been picked up. Pro found a payphone in order for Sciarra to call someone back in Providence to get the details. When Sciarra returned to the car he reported that it was Almonte who had been hauled in. According to Jack, Sciarra said that Almonte was an asshole who wanted to be a hitman, and Almonte had been running around Federal Hill bragging that he was the one responsible for the Marfeo/Melei hit. If Almonte wanted to “play gangster” he could pay the price.





Nina:

 

How many people have we heard this same story about wanting to be a hitman? Sounds like another Fed Fantasy to me. 

 

The Feds asked Jack if it might have been Almonte who called Manocchio to alert the shooters that Marfeo was in Pannone’s on the day of the hit. Jack told them that Almonte definitely wasn’t the one who called from the drugstore. Jack said that Manocchio told him it was a bookie whose name he couldn’t recall.



Lara:

 

And no I don’t buy that Jack couldn't recall who the caller was.



Nina:

 

Good, because neither do I!



Lara:

 

On May 31st, Almonte’s hair sample was sent to be compared with those found in the getaway car. The match was inconclusive, but his sample couldn't be ruled out. Herbert De Simone was the Attorney General of Rhode Island at that time. A hearing was set for July 2nd, but before it took place Almonte’s attorney managed to have bail set at $130,000. His sister posted bail and he was released during the July 2nd hearing. 



Nina:

 

Meanwhile on August 1, 1968 Raymond, Henry Tameleo, and Cassesso were indicted in State court –  this time for the July 1966 murder of Willie Marfeo. They all pleaded innocent to the charges.

 

In October, Rudy Sciarra, Robert Fairbrothers and Rinaldo DiPietrantonio were indicted for the murder of Louis Zoglio back on February 4, 1967. Zoglio was supposedly killed because of a beef he had with Alfredo “the Blind Pig” Rossi, the father of John E Rossi who we mentioned in the season one finale. Also indicted for inciting the murder were Louis Manocchio and Louis Taglianeti. To wrap up the month Raymond, Henry and Ronnie lost their Federal appeal. 




Lara:

 

In January of 1969, Federal Judge Francis J.W. Ford ordered Raymond to begin serving his sentence, and off to Atlanta he went.

 

Finally in May of 1969, Almonte’s trial began. The State claimed two masked men gunned down Rudy Marfeo and Anthony Melei, but only Bobby Almonte was on trial. Several people testified on his behalf saying that he was at the social club he ran on Atwells Ave. at the time of the double slaying. However, two of Melei’s relatives testified that they saw him in the vicinity of Pannone’s that morning.



Nina:

 

Well, the jury must have been swayed by the testimony of Melei’s family. On May 29, 1969 Almonte was convicted of the murders of Rudy Marfeo and Anthony Melei. And in a normal world, the case would have ended there, but not in New England! If you listened to the season one finale, you’ll recall that Jack Kelley was arrested on May 14th just two weeks prior to Almonte’s conviction. On June 6th he turned State’s evidence and the tale of who killed Rudy Marfeo and Anthony Melei would take on a whole new life. If you want to hear more about Jack’s statements to the Feds regarding the Marfeo/Melei hit please listen to episode 47 from last season.



Lara:

 

All summer long while in the safe hands of the US Marshals including John Partington, Jack began to dole out his version of justice. He provided details of both crimes committed and planned, but oddly enough none that he actually committed.



Nina:

 

Although he did place himself at the golf course behind Louis’ house during the Marfeo/Melei hit.



Lara:

 

True, but considering the number of heists he was involved in, it was unusual that he never copped to one he actually committed, most notably the Plymouth Mail Robbery was absent from his statements.




Nina:

 

Well, at a later date Sonny Diaferio tried to confess to it.



Lara:

 

Shush not now!



Nina:

 

Ok, ok. 

 

Besides the Marfeo/Melei hit and the Brinks robbery from December of 1968, Jack gave statements and Grand Jury testimony against Ben Tilley and Charles Domenico for the VA robbery.



Lara:

 

And more importantly, he told a Grand Jury that Jerry Angiulo laundered the money from the VA heist. We won’t be covering that today. Jack didn’t limit his justice to Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He also gave testimony against Carlo Gambino, Butchy Miceli and Pro Lerner. Jack claimed that they were planning to take down an armored car service in New York for three to five million dollars.



Nina:

 

Gambino and Butchy wouldn’t be arrested until March of 1970, and like the VA we won’t be covering that case today.

 

The Feds’ immediate concern was the Marfeo-Melei hit and the ITAR case they were building. Keeping Raymond in prison seemed to be their priority. The Marfeo/Melei murders couldn’t fall under their jurisdiction if the hitters hadn’t crossed state lines, so Jack’s testimony that he and Pro traveled to Rhode Island and Sciarra and Manocchio traveled to Massachusetts was crucial for the their case. If only locals were responsible for the double homicide, the Feds’ case would be dead in the water. And since they barely had a case to begin with, they desperately needed Jack’s testimony.

 

According to an FBI 302 dated July 30, 1969, Jack described Pro as the most dangerous man he had ever known in his more than 25 years of criminal activity and Pro appeared to relish murder. Jack claimed that Pro was involved in several homicides, but also said that Pro was extremely bright and courageous.



Lara:

 

I don’t believe there was any truth to Jack and dad’s stories about them being afraid of Pro. I can only judge by the conversions I heard over the years. Not once did I hear anything bad about Pro. The guys including dad mostly talked about him looking like Rock Hudson, being a health nut, busting dad’s chops about being Jewish, and how Pro liked to break balls in general including delivering an obese prostitute to dad’s front door in the middle of the night.



Nina:

 

More fiction! We’ll get more into that later in the season too.



Lara:

 

For sure.

 

The US Attorney decided on July 25th that charges would be brought against Pro, Sciarra, Manocchio, Rossi, Frank Venditouli and Fairbrothers both in Federal court and by the Rhode Island authorities. 

 

On August 7th, the Rhode Island Attorney General DeSimone, Suffolk County DA Garrett Byrne, Federal Prosecutor Walter Barnes, and the Boston FBI SAC Handley met to discuss the planned arrests and how they would be handled by the FBI rather than local authorities. 

 

On August 11th a memo was sent from J.H. Gale to DeLoach which read:

 

“It is expected that our informant, under immunity, will testify in detail as to this matter before the Federal Grand Jury on August 14 and on the following day will be brought to Providence to testify in local court in order that murder indictments may be obtained against the subjects.” 

 

The informant being Jack Kelley of course.






Nina:

 

Now let’s get to the arrests. When we left you at the end of last season, we told you that Richie met with Pro Lerner and the other suspects while crammed into Pro’s car in the parking lot of the Rib Room in Braintree on August 8th. Pro and the other men told Richie that they had a plan to kill Jack along with the US Marshals and both of Richie’s FBI handlers, SAs Rico and Comen.  What we didn’t tell you was that Richie didn’t bother to tell his handlers this tale until after Pro had been apprehended.



Lara:

 

So dad!

 

According to the story that I know from dad, the meeting happened and part of the discussion of course was about Jack and what he potentially had on each of them, BUT the murder plot tale was Rico’s guarantee for a ticket out of town.



Nina:

 

To the sunny beaches of Florida!



Lara:

 

Exactly!

 

Dad waited for the arrests to go down to prevent any extra drama. The tale was designed to torment Comen and ensure Rico’s wish for fun in the sun would make it all the way to J. Edgar Hoover’s desk.



Nina:

 

I believe that entirely.

 

Warrants were issued on August 11 for Fairbrothers, Sciarra, Manocchio, Vendituoli, Patriarca and Pro Lerner. The following day the arrests began. Pro was the second to be picked up.



Lara:

 

You finally get to tell the story about how they broke SA Comen.





Nina:

 

At last! 

 

Just two days prior to the 7th anniversary of the Plymouth Mail Robbery on the morning of August 12th 1969, Pro was arrested. SAs Gerard Comen, Raymond Ball and John Sweeney were part of the team of Feds and Brookline Police that arrested Pro at his home on Verndale Road in Brookline, MA that he shared with his parents, three sisters, wife and two children. The authorities arrived at roughly 6 AM, and Pro answered the door in his boxer shorts and asked permission to put some pants on.  SA Comen escorted Pro to his bedroom. When Pro opened the closet Comen observed a brown leather case in close reach of Pro which appeared to have a gun butt protruding from it at which time Comen reached for the case which contained a .45 caliber pearl handled pistol with one round in the chamber and a fully loaded clip, a Savage 77E .12 gauge pump action shotgun that was unloaded and two empty handgun boxes. 

 

In my imagination, this is like a Frat Boy thing. There’s the one guy that nobody really likes because he’s a boy scout and who’s the butt of all the jokes, so they sent Gerard in there alone with a man they all believed was a serial killer.



Lara:

 

You remember that according to Frankie Salemme, Rico took a drop piece from him to kill Georgie Mclaughlin with, but at the last minute aborted the plan because he didn’t trust Comen to go along with it. No doubt Rico still had a resentment against Comen for that. 

 

The Feds used Gerard’s observations to get a warrant from the local police in Brookline to search Pro’s home. Captain May reported to the Feds that the basement was being used as a shooting gallery and various caliber slugs were removed from the beams and walls of the basement. That story would be repeated by more than a few informants over the years as if it were firsthand knowledge.  But my favorite part of the tale is that Pro told the Feds that he had attended the church of Scientology in Los Angeles and that he studied the Philosophy of life!



Nina:

 

Seriously? Talk about a ball breaker!!! At least they got the part right about him being a former US Marine.



Lara:

 

He was screwing with the Feds and they reported like he was serious!

 

Nina:

 

I wish I could have witnessed that exchange! He had a great sense of humor. 

 

Back to the morning of August 12th. Just before Pro was pinched, Robert Fairbrothers was arrested at 5:48 in Providence without incident. When advised of his rights by the Feds, he refused to sign off on the standard form and asked to speak to his attorney. The unemployed 32 year old wasn’t the only Providence guy to be scooped up that day. At 9:10 AM John E. Rossi was arrested on Atwells Ave. also without incident. He too declined to sign off and requested to call the same attorney as Fairbrothers had. Attorney Robert S. Ciresi represented them and bail was set at $150,000 each for Fairbrothers and Rossi.



Lara:

 

Pro was brought to the US Commissioner David Nelson’s office where bail was also set at $150,000. His attorney was Gerald Alch, partner of F. Lee Bailey. Unable to make bail, Pro was transferred to the custody of the US Marshals, but not before getting a shot in at Rico.

 

Nina:

 

One of my favorites! As Pro passed Rico in the hallway, he quipped, “you look just like your photograph!”



Lara:

 

But here is the best part of that. Richie hadn’t told the Feds that tale yet, but Rico knew it was coming because he helped concoct it according to dad. So the kicker is that Rico had to look shocked and concerned! And obviously Pro was privy to some of the plot.



Nina:

 

No shortage of drama!

 

Later that evening, Richie met with Comen and Rico at the Children’s Museum which at the time was located in Jamaica Plain not far from his home. And that’s when he sprung the tale of the murder plot on them. The infamous Rib Room story. Richie’s excuse for not coming forward earlier was that he claimed he felt his life would have been in jeopardy, but with Pro now incarcerated he felt it was safe. 




Lara:

 

Even good old J. Edgar Hoover took a personal interest in dad’s story, sending a memo to the SAC in Boston the next day asking that he give Rico’s security his “personal attention” and “insure adequate protection is afforded Rico and his family…”

 

Four special agents were assigned to protect Rico and his family around the clock. In addition Rico was instructed not to contact his CIs alone, but that two other agents accompany him at all times. Another teaser for the next episode.



Nina:

 

With Lara’s favorite, Frankie Salemme! 

 

Clearly the plot worked since J Edgar Hoover bought it hook, line, and sinker.



Lara:

 

Another one of dad’s fuck with the Feds plans.



Nina:

 

One of many!

 

Hoover also wanted to know if they could put Richie on the stand to testify about the plot to kill Rico. There was also a question of whether the US Attorney would agree to give Richie immunity and protective custody.

 

Richie played it up and said he’d consider testifying but only if he and his family were given protection and relocated afterward.



Lara:

 

Well needless to say that never happened!

 

In the meantime, the authorities were searching for Frank Vendituoli, Rudy Sciarra and Louis Manocchio. Their friends and family members were questioned as to their whereabouts. A Woonsocket man offered to give up Sciarra’s location in exchange for $2000. Three days later on August 15th Sciarra was apprehended in a pre-dawn raid at the residence of Joseph Ambrogio in Upton, MA by ASAC Rampton, SAs Kehoe, Sweeney, Ring, and Ball who found him sleeping in a first floor bedroom. SA Ball advised Sciarra of his rights, but like Fairbrothers and Rossi he refused to sign off. After his arraignment a hearing was scheduled for August 25th. Like Pro Lerner, Sciarra was transferred by the Marshals to the Worcester County House of Correction. 



Nina:

 

You’ll notice that Kehoe just had to be there for that arrest. 

 

In case anyone was wondering, the conviction against Robert Almonte was cleared after his attorney filed for a motion for a new trial.



Lara:

 

Another name to add to the list of wrongfully convicted.



Nina:

 

Or not! We’ll get into our theories about who the real murderers might have been or more accurately who they most likely weren’t later on and Almonte will be making more appearances this season.

 

The same day that Sciarra was arrested, Pro’s bail was decreased to $50,000.



Lara:

 

Doesn’t it strike you as strange that his family didn’t use the 87 Verndale Street property to secure the bond for Pro’s release?



Nina:

 

Very strange considering his father owned the property. Maybe Alch advised Pro and his family that it was pointless.



Lara:

 

Oh probably!



Nina:

 

Sciarra had no problem making bail. He was released on August 19th on $50,000 surety bond. He was also represented by Ciresi.

 

Lara:

 

But not for long! He was promptly rearrested by Rhode Island authorities and sent to ACI Howard to face several other charges.



Nina:

 

The previous day Rossi and Fairbrothers had both been released on $40,000 surety each, and they too were rearrested and shipped off to Howard.



Lara:

 

Let’s backtrack a couple of days to when Sciarra was pinched. Frank Imbruglia was stopped just after midnight at the intersection of Social Street and Diamond Hill Road, in Woonsocket, RI by ASAC Rampton and SA Kehoe as they believed he knew the location of Sciarra. Of course he wasn’t in Imbruglia’s car, BUT Imbruglia did know where Sciarra was and that’s how the Feds made their way to Ambrogio’s house in Upton.

 

The Feds knew they had no grounds to hold Imbruglia, but their bluff paid off. He would also later confess to having rented a motel room for Rudy in Revere, MA.

 

In the meantime dad was busy with his disinformation campaign. On August 24th, he met with SAs Comen and Welby at their usual meetup spot, the old Children’s Museum. Dad told them that on August 20th, Pro’s wife had come to our family’s store on Charles St. in Boston. According to his tale Attorney Alch took Reenie to see Pro who was by then being held at the Dedham House of Correction. Pro told his wife to relay to dad that after his bail hearing he would look for a new attorney.



Nina:

 

That’s how he ended up with Ronnie Chisholm!



Lara:

 

Exactly! Anyone who wants to hear a little more about Ronnie’s early days should listen to episode 26, The Defense Never Rests.  Reenie or Frank Capizzi would contact dad to tell him who the attorney would be and dad would then falsify documents regarding the Marfeo/Melei murders. Supposedly part of the statements would include that Jack was testifying out of spite. Dad was to state that he had been Jack’s driver for nearly a decade, and he was to testify about Jack’s mental capacity.



Nina:

 

Well, lack of mental capacity was the implication. The Alzheimer's story had already been cooked up. Another teaser for later in the season.

 

Richie also stated that he was to contact Steven Jaconbson, a close friend of Frank Capizzi and Pro, if he needed money. Jacobson would then get the money from Louis Manocchio.



Lara:

 

What a twisted thread that was.



Nina:

 

Oh Richie had more! The story continued that Pro was worried that Roy Appleton, Paul Christy and Billy Kenney would testify against him, so Pro was looking for someone to take them out!



Lara:

 

First of all, who the hell was Steven Jacobson?



Nina:

 

You’ve got me! I asked you that!!!



Lara:

 

Kenney went on to own a toney beauty salon in Wellesley, Christy was related to the RI crew. You figured that out and Roy eventually did himself in because of cancer.



Nina:

 

What I do know is that Richie really didn’t like Capizzi and Imbruglia!



Lara:

 

No question about that!

 

Now, here’s where the story gets even nuttier. Supposedly, Rudy Sciarra sent word up through Paul Christy that Billy Kenney was supposed to get whacked. Dad warned Kenney who according to dad was going to sell his boat, buy a Cadillac El Dorado and take it on the lam!



Nina;

 

Yeah like the El Dorado would go unnoticed. 

 

And the tale gets wilder! Richie told the Feds that “that bastard Lerner, got what he deserved.” The Feds asked him what he meant by that. Richie said that Pro was “a sadistic killer who got his kicks off of watching people bleed.” He said that Pro bragged to him how he shot Billy Aggie (Agisotelis) in the head with a .45 while they had a casual conversation.



Lara:

 

That 302 has been quoted more times than I care to think about. I’m surprised how many others claim that story as their own, but there’s no shortage of liars in any of these sagas.

 

The following day on August 25th, dad met with Welby and Comen for a second time, but this time at Arby’s Roast Beef on Route 1 in Dedham, MA. He wanted to report on a conversation he had on August 21st with Frank Capizzi and Steven Jacobson in front of the Prudential Center in Boston.



Nina:

 

Why didn’t he tell them about that meeting when he met with Welby and Comen the day before? That makes no sense!



Lara:

 

Well knowing dad, it wasn’t because they were pressed for time and he couldn’t continue, it was because he hadn’t concocted the story yet!

 

The story goes that Jacobson excused himself and Capizzi sat in dad’s Chrysler station wagon. Dad actually used to call it a beach wagon. It belonged to the store. They used it to deliver groceries. Anyhow, Capizzi told dad that Manocchio had decided that Richie needed to get out of town until after the Marfeo/Melei trial began. Capizzi also told him that Christy and Kenney were still on the hit parade and so was Imbruglia but he escaped death because his parole had been violated.

 

Nina:

 

And Richie had to retell one of his favorite stories about what a great liar he was! The story about how he went on the radio during the Plymouth Mail Robbery investigation and said he was a double agent for the Postal Inspectors and the Feds.



Lara;

 

Well actually dad was a triple agent because he dragged F. Lee Bailey into that saga. If you want to hear about that you can also find that in the Defense Never Rests episode.



Nina:

 

I want to give a little more background on Frank Imbruglia since he will be back later in the season as one of the men involved in the attempted hit on Frankie Salemme in 1989.



Lara:

 

And he briefly appeared in season one.




Nina:

 

Exactly. If anyone listened to our three part Teddy Deegan series, they might remember that Imbruglia’s name appeared multiple times in the initial interviews regarding Teddy’s murder. Imbruglia was running with Romeo Martin, a close friend of Teddy Deegan and suspect in Teddy’s murder. They were both arrested in 1965 for kidnapping a Newton housewife in her own car and robbing her of $70,000 worth of jewelry and furs. Romeo Martin had been killed in July of ‘65. In October of that year Imbruglia received a sentence of 7 to 10 years, and that was the conviction that he was on parole for when the RI authorities and Feds were able to get him to give up Rudy Sciarra’s location.



Lara:

 

That parole violation likely saved his life, but it opened up an investigation into his having been granted parole in May of ‘69.



Nina:

 

Imbruglia made sure that he was arrested along with Rudy to make it look like he was forced to cooperate with the Feds. The agreement with the FBI was that he would be released on bond and the charges for harboring Rudy would be dropped. Imbruglia claimed that he had not known that Rudy was being sought by the FBI when he offered to help Rudy find a place to stay. The Feds kept their end of the bargain and that’s exactly what happened.



Lara:

 

In the meantime, on August 26th, Jack Kelley was brought to the Rhode Island Superior court to offer testimony at the state bail hearings of Sciarra, Lerner, Fairbrothers and Rossi. Pro offered the theory that Jack was testifying against him because Jack told pro to kill Tommy Richards and Pro refused. Jack of course denied the story.



Nina:

 

My favorite incident from that hearing involved Sciarra. As the men were being led away for the afternoon recess, Rudy Sciarra started cursing the RI Assistant Attorney General Richard Israel, yelling, “I’ll get you, you bastard! I’ll see tears running down your face before this is over!” He then punched the wooden door as he exited the courtroom and broke his right hand. When they returned from the break, Rudy’s attorney had to ask the judge for permission to take Rudy to the hospital for x-rays and a cast.

 

Richard Israel is still alive. I’d love to get an interview with him.





Lara:

 

The four were returned to Howard and held without bail based on Jack’s testimony. Let’s not forget Raymond Patriarca was charged along with the others. Their trial wouldn’t begin until March of 1970. We’ll be discussing the trial in episode 5. In the meantime, Louis Manocchio and Frank Venditouli were on the lam. Which brings us to next week’s episode - Taking it on the Lam!



Nina:

 

And it wasn’t just those two. Mello Merlino was hiding out in order to avoid being arrested for the 1968 Brink’s Heist which we covered in episode 46. Frankie Salemme and Stevie Flemmi also fled on the advice of H. Paul Rico for the car bombing of attorney John Fitzgerald. I can’t wait until next week. Rico met with them supposedly with just Gerard as his backup. We’ll be covering their travels, adventures and the many manhunts.



Lara:

 

Who didn’t the Feds interview? And Louis Manocchio’s journey will have its own episode the following week, Where in the World is Louis?

 

Now, I haven’t asked for reviews and all of those other things, but we do need more YouTube subscribers. 



Nina:

 

The link to our channel is in the show notes! Lara is trying to do slide shows for each episode moving forward.



Lara:

 

Trying! 

 

Thank you all for listening! 



Nina & Lara:

 

BYE!!!!